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20110701
20110731
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CNN 42
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Search Results 0 to 85 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Jul 10, 2011 12:00am PDT
days? >> i think the television, i've been involved with the television casting programs in britain. no question that does help. the fundamental thing is doesn't matter who you are or what you are that you do want to go out to some kind of live event and people like the idea. even if it's going to a restaurant. they can't just sit over their computers all day and play endless games and twitter all the time. people actually do like the thought of going to a space where they hear the reaction of other people. and they can hear, if you're part of a communal experience in the theater. >> many of your colleagues in the world of theater, you're not remotely snobbish about talent shows. you've been a judge on shows in britain. you've been a mentor to "american idol." what is your view of them? can they produce bona fide a stars, do you think? >> of course they can. the real thing which i found in britain, more difficult to do here because it's such a big country that people think it's, if i live in san francisco why would i vote for a girl who might be going to the "wizard of oz" or broadw
CNN
Jul 1, 2011 9:00pm PDT
britain. no question that does help. but the fundamental thing is that it doesn't matter who you are, what you are, that you do want to go out to some kindof live event and people like the idea. they can't sit in front of their computers and play games and twitter all the time. people actually do like the thought of going to a space where they hear the reaction of other people and they can hear -- you're part of a communal experience in the theater. >> how about many of your colleagues in the theater. you're not snobbish about talent shows. you've been a judge on shows. you've been a mentor on "american idol". can they produce bona fide stars? >> yes, they can. and the real thing which i found in britain, more difficult to do here, of course, because it's such a big country, people think it's odd why if i live in san francisco vote for a girl who might be going to the "wizard of oz" on broadway. kids were coming from background where they couldn't see me in an audition. >> you saw that on "american idol" when you mentored that as well. you would see these kids that come from nowhere.
CNN
Jul 18, 2011 9:00pm EDT
? and as rupert murdoch prepares to address members of parliament in britain tomorrow, how serious is this moment for him and his company? >> it's dreadfully serious for rupert murdoch, his family and his company. the company itself i don't think is in jeopardy. it's the second or third largest media company in the world, but murdoch's aura of invincibility is gone. his lieutenants are apples falling from the tree. his argument it was a few rotten apples is discredited. it's really a barrel problem. he has to deal with that, and he knows in coming days, not just in his testimony tomorrow, but in coming days, there will be more apples that will be revealed to have been rotten. he has a lot to answer for. >> i can say from my experience, editing a newspaper for him and this was, five, six years before any of this phone hacking began, but certainly when i worked for him, he wanted his editors toagl of the things would you expect from a tabloid newspaper, but always to operate within the law. and i find it impossible, personally knowing the man, to think he would have known about law brea
CNN
Jul 9, 2011 12:00am EDT
in britain for five days. you brought the heat, lady. >> yes. >> what i'm fascinated with your new album the fact you took this year off. this is a woman who has worked so hard in the way that your parents did before you. when you have this year off, what did you learn about yourself? >> i learned a lot about myself. the biggest thing i learned is i love to perform. i love music. i love what i do. i love singing in the studio and writing songs and coming up with video treatments to the point that during that year i do not count the 72 songs i recorded as work because it's what i was born to do and i learned balance. i learned the importance of taking time for myself and i was moving around so much that i had no idea that i really have 16 grammys, like i've heard that and i got up and accepted my awards, but i didn't realize what an amazing accomplishment that was. >> you never had time presumably. it's just this treadmill. the more successful you get the less time you have to enjoy anything. >> exactly. >> so finally, you went, enough, i'm having a year off. i'm going to enjoy what
CNN
Jul 8, 2011 12:00am EDT
the media in britain would assume that that meant he felt that she was probably guilty of other offenses. is it similar in america in that sense? i mean would you assume with your legal brain that he was making a point there? >> i think he might be. it's tough to know. this was certainly -- remember, the crimes here we're talking about are lying to the authorities, and these were pretty egregious meaning she did send the authorities on a wild goose chase, which is a horrible thing to do, and as a result, you could make an argument that it deserved the maximum punishment. but i agree with you, that i think there's something more at play here. for this judge to give the maximum, meaning a year on each of the four counts, and then say she has to serve them consecutively, meaning one after the other, is a very stiff sentence for this crime. >> yeah. and i think quite telling. i'm about to interview the prosecutor, jeff ashton, who was i tell you was pretty shocked by what happened. if you were about to talk to him, dan, what would you say to him? >> i guess one of the things i would
CNN
Jul 3, 2011 9:00pm PDT
sort of answer because i've got my choice. i can play for ireland, i can play for great britain. it's a tough one. i mean -- it's always going to be -- i'm always going to have to answer that and deal with that question because of where i grew up and it's -- i regard myself as northern irish that's all i can really say. >> that's probably the diplomatic answer as well. >> yeah. have to be. >> did you have a tough upbringing, would you say? >> no. >> did you have much money as a family? >> no, no, not at all. my mom and dad worked very hard to give me the best chance not just in golf but in life. i was an only child. my dad worked three jobs at one stage. my mom worked night shifts in a factory. >> what did they do? >> my dad was a bar manager and worked in separate places, in the daytime, then at the night. my mom work in a factory that produced tape and sort of industrial goods and she worked night shift in there. so they worked very hard. and i -- being so young, you're sort of oblivious to it all. it is only when you become a little older and a little wiser that you realize h
CNN
Jul 10, 2011 9:00pm PDT
fascinating character. you know, i mean, my knowledge of the hulk is even in britain this guy was huge, physically, on television, as a box office star. how would you sum up marriage to the hulk? >> well, we were married for 24 years. and you know, it was great. i mean, honestly, i never dreamed that we would end up having the lifestyle that we did. when i met him, he was in the "rocky 3" movie, and i thought that he was an actor playing a wrestler, because in california back then wrestling wasn't even on tv, and i didn't know what it was. i was like, you wrestle? like what is that? so -- but you know, soon after we started going out. we got married, and i went on the road with him, and i learned. i realized what was all involved. and it's quite a job. i mean, especially working with the wwf. that was a huge empire that, you know, became even bigger. rock and roll. it was like being married to a rock star. >> and of course as the book details his behavior became pretty similar to that of most rock stars. i mean, let's be brutally frank. you know, you had to go through the infidelity, t
CNN
Jul 13, 2011 9:00pm EDT
crisis where britain was involved in an action we told them not to be involved in and britain said, no, we're going forward with our interest there and america threatened using economic policy because we held so much of their debt. i am scared of the day america -- foreign policy will be affected by those people who hold our debt and they will be able to reign control over us. this is very crucial. >> if i could go on that, we know who you're talking about, china already owns more than a quarter of america's debt. that's a staggering amount of debt to be held by one nation. at the moment, they haven't flexed their muscles in the way you just discussed but they could, couldn't they? >> absolutely. that's what i worry about. i think the future of foreign policy is going to be even more, i think it already is, even more controlled by economic interests and economic strength. that's why america should be focusing in my opinion and i think often like the president says, healing our economy and strengthening our nation economically and relieving us, like we are addicts right now, relievi
CNN
Jul 15, 2011 6:00pm PDT
. the difference between government and private enterprise. >> unlike in britain where you have the class system, depending where you went to school and what your parents did and who you were bred into, that is often how you get on in life. in america, i spent four or five years immersing myself in this culture. class system is based on hard work, success and achievement. not surprising to me the people governing the country pander to that by this rhetoric everything has to make a profit. that's the way you have a yardstick of success here, isn't it? >> if you're talking about social mobility, that is always defined as the american dream. the ability of one generation to do better than the generation that spawned them. that was something always quintessentially american. we're tenth in the american dream right now, tenth in social mobility compared to other countries around the world which is like sweden coming in 10th in swedish meatballs. it's inter-u. u.just a shame. >> and donald trump, i know your views on the presidency campaign were strident. i like him. when he was lashing i
CNN
Jul 5, 2011 9:00pm EDT
here. i've got to say in britain we done have cameras in courtrooms. and it seems to add a gravity to proceedings which i just don't see in cases like this in america. i was quite disturbed, e i'm going to say, watching this, the reaction from people that i knew from friends and work colleagues in america who were gripped by every twist and turn, that they were watching what appeared to be an ongoing reality tv show and not a very serious murder trial. is this not the problem with having cameras in these courtrooms? >> well, i'm very proud that we have the first amendment here in america and we can shine the light on all three of our branches of government -- legislative, executive, and judicial. anyone can walk into a courtroom and watch a trial. we have open, public trials. and sticking a camera in the courtroom only adds modern technology to that equation. in all the studies -- i was at court tv for eight years. all the studies show after the first hour or two everybody in the courtroom forgets about the cameras. if there's ever an example of how cameras in the courtroom don't a
CNN
Jul 15, 2011 12:00am PDT
in britain. and it seems that without the cameras we don't lose anything. but you do lose something here in america. because it tends to turn these trials into a soap opera. >> well, you know, i believe in freedom of speech. i believe in so much that surrounds that. but i will tell you personally, i found it very awkward and disturbing. for example, i would be having conversations and in the evening i would see that there were lip readers and people who were body language experts going on television saying this was what appears to have been said, this is what was meant when this attorney moved this way, my client turned her head a certain way. imagine being on television for 400 or 500 hours of a trial. it's incredibly stressful. and i think also very stressful for the witnesses who knew that as they spoke, every word they said was being televised. affect maybe not so much what they said but how they said it. i found it extremely, extremely difficult. >> tell me this, dorothy. what is your gut feeling about what happened to caylee anthony? >> well; , i think that the key here, in my
CNN
Jul 28, 2011 12:00am EDT
, the taxation here is not that high compared to places like britain, for example, and they should be doing this now, that is how actually to deal with cutting spending but raising taxes, that is how you get out of this mess. do you agree with that? >> it's true. it's absolutely true. and i think you have to look at what's on the table now. what we have is not what the president has proposed, which is a balanced approach. it's an approach where the democrats are giving and the republicans are not. the deal on the table from harry reid, the democratic leader of the united states senate, includes no new revenues. the democrats are the ones who have come to the table and said listen, we are willing to compromise. the republicans, because speaker boehner has the tea party that he has to deal with, he has to control his own caucus, can't come to the table and say okay, we'll take some new revenues. >> kai ryssdale, fascinating conversation. please come back and talk to me again. it's going to be a huge story as it unfolds toward august 2nd. >> pleasure. >> the front man of maroon 5 adam
CNN
Jul 11, 2011 9:00pm PDT
the marine corps make a profit. >> piers: america is a country, unlike in britain where you have the class system, where you went too school and who your parents are and who you are bred into, that's how you get on in life. in america, i've spend four or five years immering myself in this culture, the class system is built on hard work, success and achievement. it's surprising to me the people governing the country pander to that by this rhetoric of everything has to make a profit because the way you have a yardstick of success. >> if you're talking about social mobility, yes, that's the american dream, the ability of one generation to do better than the generation that spawned them. that was something that was quintessentially american. we're tenth in the american dream right now. we're tenth in social mobility compared to other countries around the world. which is like sweden coming in tenth for swedish meat balls. >> piers: i happen to be on donald trump. i like him. i've been on one of his shows obviously. he went lashing into china, i thought he slightly missed the point. it see
CNN
Jul 6, 2011 12:00am PDT
got to say in britain we done have cameras in courtrooms. and it seems to add a gravity to proceedings which i just don't see in cases like this in america. i was quite disturbed, e i'm going to say, watching this, the reaction from people that i knew from friends and work colleagues in america who were gripped by every twist and turn, that they were watching what appeared to be an ongoing reality tv show and not a very serious murder trial. is this not the problem with having cameras in these courtrooms? >> well, i'm very proud that we if there's ever an example of how cameras in the courtroom don't affect the outcome i think it would be this case. i mean, there was a media drum beat for three years of guilt, guilt, guilt, and the jury today not only rejected the prosecution's case, they rejected the media's view of this case. i think this is a perfect example of how cameras don't harm anything. jurors way the case based on the evidence. that's what they make their decision based upon, and i say good for them. >> alan dershowitz, before the break you were informing me it's
CNN
Jul 29, 2011 9:00pm EDT
seen this. >> i can't imagine this happening in britain. because if they tried this stunt on the british public they'd be drummed out of parliament. it seems there are two worlds here, the politicians down on this hill who are just squabbling as they normally do without any sense of the mounting outrage. >> yeah. and the -- i don't think anybody is going to come out of this looking very good. all these arguments who this benefits, the republicans or democrats. all of them come out looking pretty poor. we're going to continue the breaking news coverage you're been doing piers on 360 tonight. all the last-minute debt drama happening on capitol hill. democrats in the senate speak a short time ago, publicly calling for negotiations and compromise, political posturing in full effect as it has been. a full team in washington tonight. john king, gloria borger, jessica yellin working their sources. alley bell is here to talk money. the economic fallout already costing you money. also the raw politics of how a deal could get done. fascinating conversation with james carville and eric eric
Search Results 0 to 85 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)